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CPAP Headgear & Accessories

CPAP & Accessories Sleep Therapy

Nasal CPAP devices deliver air into your airway through a specially designed nasal mask. The mask does not breathe for you, the flow of air creates enough pressure when you inhale to keep your airway open. CPAP is considered the most effective nonsurgical treatment for the alleviation of snoring and obstructive Sleep Apnea.

CPAP Headgear & Accessories
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Humidifiers,
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How CPAP works:
There are several treatments for OSA including surgery and CPAP therapy. However, CPAP therapy has proven very effective for most patients. CPAP stands for “continuous positive airway pressure” which is exactly what the DeVilbiss IntelliPAP device delivers to your upper airway, acting as an “air splint” to keep the passage open while you sleep.

This reduces or eliminates the obstruction, allowing you to enjoy the deep, refreshing, uninterrupted sleep you need. More importantly, your body will get the rest and oxygen it needs with more continuous, uninterrupted sleep – helping you avoid some of the serious health risks associated with OSA.

How CPAP Therapy Works:
There are several treatments for OSA including surgery and CPAP therapy. However, CPAP therapy has proven very effective for most patients. CPAP stands for “continuous positive airway pressure” which is exactly what the machines deliver to your upper airway, acting as an “air splint” to keep the passage open while you sleep.

This reduces or eliminates the obstruction, allowing you to enjoy the deep, refreshing, uninterrupted sleep you need. More importantly, your body will get the rest and oxygen it needs with more continuous, uninterrupted sleep – helping you avoid some of the serious health risks associated with OSA.

More on Sleep Apnea:
Obstructive Sleep Apnea (OSA) is a breathing disorder that affects more than 22 million Americans – approximately 4% of middle-aged men and 2% of middle-aged women.

Physiological factors such as size of tonsils, shape of the nose, narrowing of the upper airway, or any combination of these can contribute to the potential for having OSA. During sleep, your airway can relax so much that it begins to collapse and becomes obstructed. Relaxation allows the tissue at the back of your throat to vibrate as you breathe causing snoring. But as your airway collapses more fully, it blocks your airflow and stops your breathing altogether. (In fact, the word “apnea” is derived from a Greek term meaning “without breath.”)

This stoppage occurs repeatedly throughout the night, each episode lasting from just a few seconds to more than a minute. As your blood oxygen level drops to dangerous levels, your central nervous system triggers a sudden gasp for breath, partially awakening you and preventing you from experiencing the sustained, deep sleep your body needs. As a result, it is common to feel fatigued, stressed and irritable the following day – a less-than-optimal and potentially dangerous condition in which to work, drive, and make decisions.

There are important medical concerns as well. OSA starves your heart, brain, and organs of life-sustaining oxygen. Over time, this deprivation can seriously impact your health potentially resulting in memory loss, impotence, hypertension, coronary disease, strokes, and heart attacks. Recent studies indicate that OSA has the same risk factor for heart disease as smoking, high cholesterol and alcohol, and estimate that as many as 38,000 people a year die from the effects of OSA.